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eHow asked Marks & Frantz “How to Choose a Living Room Paint Color”! Click on the eHow article to read on!

 

New Press Page, check it out!

We are so excited about our new press page, we want to scream it from the rooftops! Our web designer Jeff re-worked the page so that it is much more informative, user-friendly and just downright good lookin’! Sign up for the mailing list on our home page…. lots of exciting press and events coming soon. Cocktails, we promise!

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Lonny Magazine Interviews Marks & Frantz!

The new issue of Lonny Magazine is out and we are in it!  Michelle Adams, Editor-in-Chief of Lonny Magazine, discusses the Access to Design program at the NYDC with us.  Watch the video  here.  And enjoy the rest of the magazine too – we will!

New York Design Center chats with Lydia Marks, set decorator from Sex and the City

Behind the Scenes with Sex And The City Set Decorator Lydia Marks

– New York Design Center, June 2010

“The New York Design Center had the pleasure of chatting with Lydia Marks, of Marks & Frantz, the set decorator for Sex and the City 1 and 2, as well many other stylish films (i.e. The Devil Wears Prada). Here is an inside look at how Carrie Bradshaw “Cheated on fashion with furniture,” and some other fabulous tips on designing for the big screen and your own home:

Each character from Sex and the City not only is incredibly fashionable, but also has a very distinct and characteristic personal style. How did you translate that individualism to each character’s home?

Color palette has a lot to do with the individuality of each character’s home. For example, Charlotte is whites and creams, Miranda is earth tones, moss greens, and reds, Samantha is white and metal with orange accents and Carrie’s new apartment is subdued shades of browns and blues with a lot of texture.

You’ve decorated such a range of sets—from The Devil Wears Prada to Night at the Museum. Do you have any signatures, large or small, that you try to incorporate into everything you do?

I try to make my sets feel natural, on every project. Generally that means personal objects, or a special piece of art, or something that only that character would have. I do this even on really sleek and spare sets. In Miranda Priestly’s office in DWP, she had a beautiful leather notebook (we put some special notes in it too), a silver pen, and a few small dishes on her desk that held office supplies that looked like they came from travels she may have taken or gifts from someone.

Each character from Sex and the City not only is incredibly fashionable, but also has a very distinct and characteristic personal style. How did you translate that individualism to each character’s home?

Color palette has a lot to do with the individuality of each character’s home. For example, Charlotte is whites and creams, Miranda is earth tones, moss greens, and reds, Samantha is white and metal with orange accents and Carrie’s new apartment is subdued shades of browns and blues with a lot of texture.

Being on a movie like Sex and the City where the fashion plays such a large part, did you ever have to change elements of the set to complement the costumes?

It was tricky to decorate the sets with wardrobe in mind on Sex and the City, because often the wardrobe is not chosen far enough in advance. A lot of the furniture upholstery and curtain fabrication need to happen before the costumes are finished being selected. In the instances where I can do it, I try to. We chose the blue Donghia fabric for Carrie’s sofa partially because we thought it would look amazing with the dress she wears in the final scene of the film.

Each character from Sex and the City not only is incredibly fashionable, but also has a very distinct and characteristic personal style. How did you translate that individualism to each character’s home?Color palette has a lot to do with the individuality of each character’s home. For example, Charlotte is whites and creams, Miranda is earth tones, moss greens, and reds, Samantha is white and metal with orange accents and Carrie’s new apartment is subdued shades of browns and blues with a lot of texture.

Based on your experiences, do you believe that a set should be a reflection of what the audience already knows about a character, or that a set should help audiences understand and learn more about that character?The set should reinforce what the director wants the audience to understand about the character. Sometimes an actor is not going to be onscreen for too long, and their set is a very quick way to learn who they are. It can often provide a little back story – giving the character some history that brings depth to the role.

We know you shop the trade for many of your sets—are there certain resources you prefer more than others?

Trade shopping is very useful for some things on film sets and not as useful for other things. It is amazing for fabric and wallpaper. I can generally get delivery on these things fairly quickly. Unlike my residential work, where shopping for furniture available to the trade is indispensable, it is tricky for film work. I hardly ever have enough lead time to order custom furniture from a showroom. If I need custom pieces I go to fabricators who are used to the time demands of a film project and build pieces from scratch.

At the NYDC I used Kravet (fabric) often, they are very good with stock and ordering, Baker made their case goods and lighting available to us, Bograd Kids had really great items for Charlotte’s kids room, Hickory Chair sold us a few pieces off the floor when we really needed them, Victor’s Sample Room came in handy for a few unexpected last minute requests, HighTower Group let us rent pieces for a set as did Napier+Joseph+McNamara.

You’ve started your new company, Marks & Frantz, with Lisa Frantz. What does your background in set design bring to designing residential projects?

Both Lisa Frantz and I have backgrounds in film and photography. This background has so many advantages – we have an amazing pool of craftsman and artisans who are used to working quickly and creatively. We are used to our work being photographed up close and from views that were never considered or discussed. This makes our attention to detail very fine tuned. We can work quickly to accommodate a change in vision or new concepts. Our interiors have a lot of personality – we build a room for a client the same we develop a character’s home in a film, with a lot of details and layers.

What are your favorite challenges of residential projects vs. set design?

My favorite challenge of a residential space versus a film set is how the room will function for the client over a period of time. Obviously the client needs their space to age well, so quality, durability of fabrics and other materials is really important.”

view the full article here

Elle Decor features Marks & Frantz!

Stylish Interiors from “Sex and the City 2”

– Leah Konen, Elle Decor

Chic rooms, fabulous furnishings, and smart decorating ideas from the highly anticipated sequel

“I’ve been cheating on fashion with furniture,” quips Carrie Bradshaw, played by Sarah Jessica Parker, at the beginning of Sex and the City 2. A sequel to the smash TV show and its successful cinematic spin-off, the movie finds Carrie growing up, learning how to share a new apartment with now-husband Mr. Big (Chris Noth), and extending her passion for all things fashionable to the world of interior design.

“Carrie is trying to make a new apartment for the two of them, not just for her,” says Jeremy Conway, the production designer for the TV series and both films. To that end, Conway, along with set decorator Lydia Marks of Marks & Frantz, created a space that blends masculine elements, such as linear midcentury furnishings and dark woods, with feminine accessories, including whimsical rugs and cheerful botanical-themed fabrics.

But the stylish settings aren’t reserved for the married couple. The movie features a mix of inspiring interiors, from the familiar spaces of Charlotte (Kristin Davis) and Miranda (Cynthia Nixon) to a brand-new Times Square office for Samantha (Kim Cattrall) and even a luxurious, Moroccan-themed hotel.

view the full article here

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